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These days, we are turning toward new ways to celebrate. While we are physically distanced, we can still create opportunities to feel socially connected. In fact, we believe that now more than ever, it’s important to create delight within our immediate surroundings by honoring small moments and celebrating all that we have. And luckily, creating connection doesn’t have to be about doing something grand, especially as we navigate this uncharted present. It can simply be about relaxing, finding joy in the little things, appreciating the changing weather, cooking light and nourishing meals, and maybe embarking on a fun project. Here, we hope to bring some of the magic of abc into your summer weekends with two of our favorite activities that make us feel connected to the earth and bring forth joy.
 

Prepare a Summer Dish: abc Kitchen’s Roasted Carrot & Avocado Salad

One way to celebrate the beauty of the present moment is to cook something that diverges from your everyday go-to meals. For a nourishing summer meal that is both bright and extremely satisfying, try this beautiful, creative salad recipe from abc Kitchen. 


Ingredients

  • 2 pounds small carrots (3 to 4 inches, ½ inch thick), or large carrots quartered and cut into 3-inch segments, peeled (about 4 cups)
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 orange
  • 1 lemon
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 2 medium garlic cloves
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 avocado, cut into 12 wedges
  • 2 cups mixed baby sprouts, herbs, and microgreens
  • 4 tablespoons crème Fraiche
  • 2 tablespoons toasted sunflower seeds
  • 2 teaspoons toasted sesame seeds

Directions

  1. Adjust an oven rack to the center position and preheat the oven to 450°F. 
  2. Place the carrots in a saucepan and cover them with cold water. Season with salt, set over high heat, and bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat to medium and simmer until the carrots are tender, about 10 minutes. Drain the carrots and transfer them to a medium bowl.
  3. Cut the orange and lemon in half and juice half of each one, reserving the juice and the unjuiced halves, and discarding the juiced halves. 
  4. Combine the cumin, garlic, thyme, 2 tablespoons of olive oil, the red wine vinegar, red pepper, 1 teaspoon of the orange juice, and 1 teaspoon of the lemon juice in a blender and blend until smooth. Season the marinade to taste with salt and pepper. Add the marinade and the unjuiced citrus halves to the carrots and toss to combine. Spread the carrots and citrus halves on a rimmed baking sheet and bake until the carrots are slightly shriveled with a few brown spots, about 20 minutes. Allow the carrots to cool to room temperature.
  5. Meanwhile, squeeze the juice from the roasted citrus halves into a small bowl. Add the remaining fresh orange juice, lemon juice, remaining 6 tablespoons olive oil, and the sugar. Season the dressing to taste with salt and pepper, and whisk to combine.
  6. Divide the carrots and avocado slices onto four plates. Divide the greens among the plates on top of the carrots and avocado. Add a tablespoon of crème Fraiche to each salad. Sprinkle sunflower seeds and sesame seeds over each plate.
  7. Drizzle several tablespoons of dressing over and around each salad (reserve any remaining dressing for another use), and serve immediately.



 If you happen to live in New York City and aren’t in the mood to cook, our three restaurants are offering an exclusive combined menu for pick up and delivery. To order abc to go, you can use Caviar, Seamless, and Grubhub

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Society Limonata Table Napkin
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Cutipol Moon 5-Piece Flatware Set
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Mystic Serving Bowl Dune
Product Image - Society Limonata Table Napkin
Society Limonata Table Napkin
Product Image - Cutipol Moon 5-Piece Flatware Set
Cutipol Moon 5-Piece Flatware Set
Product Image - Mystic Serving Bowl Dune
Mystic Serving Bowl Dune

Make Natural Dye with Avocado Pits

Making something beautiful by hand is a pastime most of us don’t partake in regularly. Natural dyeing is an at-home craft that makes use of food scraps while transforming and enlivening an old fabric or garment. Using saved avocado pits, you can easily make a natural dye that produces a soft terracotta color, a summery hue, perfect for revitalizing linens, scarves, socks, dishcloths, and beyond. Making use of the natural resources that surround us both heightens our connection with the earth and acknowledges all the beauty and bounty that it provides for us.

Restaurant -

Restaurant -

The Dye Process:

For this dye, all you need are the pits. First, wash and dry them. Then, add enough water to cover your fabrics and bring the water to a soft boil. Generally, each half-pound of fabric needs about five pits to develop the signature summery pink hue. As the water gently simmers, the shells will peel off and the pits will split open, slowly turning the water a vibrant crimson. Let this steep overnight, and in the morning, add your damp fabric to the water until it’s absorbed to your desired shade. 

Samantha Verrone, founder, and designer of her eponymous textile brand shared with us some of her tips for dyeing at home with discarded avocado pits.
“I like dyeing with avocado seeds and skins because the natural tannins mean I don't need a mordant in order for the color to adhere to the cloth. I love the cross-pollination of creativity compost dyeing provides. Using food waste to create beautiful textiles or renew a favorite garment that's been stained or needs a color change is very satisfying.”
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    Samantha’s Tips:

  • Use dedicated pots and utensils “It's always best to have dedicated pots and utensils for dyeing. Garage sales (not so much right now!) or eBay are great sources for finding old pots, strainers, wooden spoons, and tongs. Stainless steel or enamel non-reactive pots are what you want.”
  • Skip straining with cotton vegetable bags “I like to use cotton drawstring vegetable bags, filling them with 5 or 6 seeds and/or skins because you can skip the straining step and in the end, you'll have a beautifully dyed bag that you can use for more dyeing or another purpose. 
  • For intense color, use protein-based fibers “Protein-based fibers (wool and silk) have easier color uptake than cellulose fiber (cotton, linen, and hemp).  So you'll achieve more intensity of color with wool and silk.”
  • Don’t overheat “Heat the water slowly and only bring it to a gentle simmer. You want to gently coax the color out. Experiment.”
  • Experiment with color “Try shifting the color by creating an after-bath with a teaspoon of baking soda in a pot of water or a teaspoon of white vinegar. Avocados are pH-sensitive so the shift of alkaline to acid will make the color either deeper, more mauve, or brighter and peach-toned.  Rust (iron) is an alkaline color changer and so when I dye with rust and avocado the color transforms from pink to mauve-y grays.”
  • Keep a notebook “Try different fabrics and leave them in for varying lengths of time. Keep a dye notebook documenting your efforts.”
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